Hotels of Eureka Springs, Arkansas, USA: Crescent and Basin Park *

Eureka Springs, dubbed `the Little Switzerland of the USA` is a small town in the Ozark Mountains, in the North-Western part of Arkansas. Today, it is one of the best-preserved late-nineteenth-century architectural complexes; its cozy chalets, elegant lodges, public buildings, and imposing hotels still echo the glory of a turn of the century spa town.…

Fire Hydrants in the ​USA

 A first noticeable difference between Europe and the USA is the one of the fire hydrants. In the former, the fire hydrants are usually located underground (1) whereas in the latter, they are above the ground and they have a pillar-like appearance. This form is a nineteenth-century invention. The shape and form of the pillars` caps…

Mailboxes of America

Americans like to attach a symbol to things that in some other parts of the world are not even considered a part of a person or a house`s identity. There is much talk about the flag but true stars are mailboxes as well. The fact that a significant part of America`s population lives in individual houses…

A Visit to the Clinton House Museum

In the northwestern part of Arkansas, in the heart of the picturesque Ozarks, remarkable for their soft hilly appearance and scented air, the traveler comes across a brick unassuming house, manor-like, built in the Tudor style, sometime in the interwar time. It was built in 1931 precisely, at a time when this popular style of…

The Multi-Faces of Neo-Classicism​ at the end of the 19th, beginning of the 20th century (Fayetteville, North-West Arkansas)

The revival of classicism in architecture is one of the most enduring re-invention of an architectural style, spanning over two centuries, almost, the nineteenth, and the first half of the twentieth. It is then no wonder that it borrowed and crystallized influences from a wide variety of styles or subgenres typical to the mentioned period…

Dutch Colonial Revival Style in Fayetteville, North-West Arkansas

The Dutch communities from the Low Countries and the Palatinate parts of current Germany who emigrated to the United States in the eighteenth century (e.g. in New York, New Jersey, Western Connecticut) brought with them this architectural style. An eye-catcher due to its symmetrical two-sided roofs, extended eaves over the long sides that give the…